I’ve Finished

Standard

Whew. After all the endless rounds of editing, I have finished my book.

It’s a strange feeling, right after you’re done. It’s as though the bubble that you were once inside closes, and this thing floats off on its own, separate, complete. All this work cements itself, and becomes something else, something no longer pliable.

It’s right on time, too, seeing as how NaNoWriMo starts in just a few days, and there was no way I could do both. So I think I am going to take a few days (as strongly recommended to me by a wise, wise person) to rest, regroup, and get ready.

Even with this one done, or, at least, essentially done, even now, in the wake of tiredness the finishing leaves behind, I’m excited for my NaNoFiMo, for the challenge of dusting off the ghosts of manuscripts past and seeing what they hold. Maybe it’s a kind of writing-based amnesia, wanting to jump on the merry-go-round again while still dabbing my scrapes with the first-aid ointment. Maybe it’s some type of delusion.

But let’s face it. Most of us who write of fiction are deluded in some way.

Whatever it may be, I’m glad that completion is leading straight into creation. Because as difficult as it is shaping words to your will, the satisfaction when you’ve managed is worth it.

Check out  Her Cousin Much Removed,  The Great Paradox and the Innies and Outies of Time Management and Aunty Ida’s Full-Service Mental Institution (by Invitation Only).

 Sign up for my spamless newsletter. And download Better Living Through GRAVY and Other Oddities, it’s free!

 

 

 

Doing NaNoWriMo? I’m Doing NaNoFiMo

Standard

So the editing continues, but now I have a deadline. I think I’m going to do NaNoWriMo. But not in the traditional way, I’m going to cheat a little bit. Or a lot, whichever.

I have several unfinished manuscripts floating around my hard drive, and I think I’m going to dust some off, make sure they’re worth the effort, and finish them, racking up my 50,000 words in the process. I’ll be doing my very own NaNoFiMo.

Now I might set out to get a few done, start re-reading them, and decide I stopped writing them for good reason. Luckily, I have a slew of manuscripts in various stages, so if one seems like it’s not worth the effort, I can always move on to the next. One way or another, I’ll write 50,000 words in November.

I’ve always been a traditionalist when it comes to NaNo, so this marks a big change for me. But sometimes, it’s good to break out of routines, to veer away from that which has become habit. So I’m going to face this challenge with a brand-new twist and see how it goes.

Of course, on the morning of November 1, I could suddenly be inspired to write an utterly fresh, completely-yet-unthought-of book, and that’s one of the perks of NaNo. But as of now, it will be me and some old friends. Or frenemies. We’ll see.

Anyone else planning on a non-traditional NaNo?

Check out  Her Cousin Much Removed,  The Great Paradox and the Innies and Outies of Time Management and Aunty Ida’s Full-Service Mental Institution (by Invitation Only).

 Sign up for my spamless newsletter. And download Better Living Through GRAVY and Other Oddities, it’s free!

 

 

The Siren Call of New Ideas

Standard

Here’s my problem. I am terribly, terribly fickle when it comes to my work. I love a fresh, new project, all open and free of tricky bits, nothing but potential ahead of me.

I dig in. I get to know it. We progress to a first name basis. It starts to tell me its troubles and my mind wanders, only a little. Ideas start to form, sparkly ideas, ideas that must be better than my current, worn-in project. Maybe I can give the new new project a little bit of time, a small chunk carved out of my day.

Old project? What old project?

It might be a symptom of my intractable procrastination disease, or maybe it’s evidence of a fruit-fly sized attention span, which I may or may not possess. Regardless, it’s easy, no matter what the project, in those beginning, glowy stages, to forget that writing is work. Hard, sometimes tedious work. It’s not always fun, it’s not always fulfilling, but there is no way to complete a project other than plowing through it.

I’m working on learning how to balance my ideas, the shiny ones and the ones that have entered the trudging realm of edits, and the myriad of work in-between. On the plus side, at some point, I’ll suddenly have a bucketful of finished stuff.

On the minus side, it will only get that way if I finish it.

Need something to read? Check out  Her Cousin Much Removed,  The Great Paradox and the Innies and Outies of Time Management and Aunty Ida’s Full-Service Mental Institution (by Invitation Only) .

 Sign up for my spamless newsletter. And download Better Living Through GRAVY and Other Oddities, it’s free!